American Museum of Natural History

Sep 14

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When standing in front of the Museum’s dioramas, it is easy to lose yourself in the incredible realism of the scene. Taken by @dave.krugman #InsideAMNH.

When standing in front of the Museum’s dioramas, it is easy to lose yourself in the incredible realism of the scene. Taken by @dave.krugman #InsideAMNH.

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Sep 13

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@jmsuarez_ captures an empty corridor in the Mineralogy collections area. The Museum’s collections total in excess of 100,000 minerals and 3,700 gems. #InsideAMNH

@jmsuarez_ captures an empty corridor in the Mineralogy collections area. The Museum’s collections total in excess of 100,000 minerals and 3,700 gems. #InsideAMNH

Bighorn Sheep - September Morning, Alberta, Canada
Stalwart symbols of mountain wilderness, a “bachelor band” of bighorn sheep stands before Mount Athabasca in the Canadian Rockies. Male sheep older than two years leave their mothers to follow a leading ram. Horn and body size determine rank, so the leader of this band is certainly the ram on the right. 
Equally sized males may duel to secure their rank. Rivals will repeatedly face off, charge and then crash horns until one loses balance and concedes. During the mating season, when rams fight for ewes, battles are even more violent. The collisions will echo across the ravines of the Rockies, and some contenders will even be pushed off the edge.
This diorama is located in the Bernard Family Hall of North American Mammals. 

Bighorn SheepSeptember Morning, Alberta, Canada

Stalwart symbols of mountain wilderness, a “bachelor band” of bighorn sheep stands before Mount Athabasca in the Canadian Rockies. Male sheep older than two years leave their mothers to follow a leading ram. Horn and body size determine rank, so the leader of this band is certainly the ram on the right. 

Equally sized males may duel to secure their rank. Rivals will repeatedly face off, charge and then crash horns until one loses balance and concedes. During the mating season, when rams fight for ewes, battles are even more violent. The collisions will echo across the ravines of the Rockies, and some contenders will even be pushed off the edge.

This diorama is located in the Bernard Family Hall of North American Mammals

Sep 12

Hey everyone, the weekend is here! Flap your wings all the way to the Museum to learn about birds, migrations, and another flying phenom: pterosaurs!
Here are some cool links from the past week: 
Fossils of new squirrel-like species support earlier origin of mammals.
New research has identified drivers of rich bird diversity in the Neotropics.
Making a last dash to the beach? Search for these shells. 
Jack Tseng on the friends and foes you find in the Gobi desert. 
This week saw the last Super Moon of 2014.
The Margaret Mead Film Festival Returns this October!
Have a great weekend! 

Hey everyone, the weekend is here! Flap your wings all the way to the Museum to learn about birds, migrations, and another flying phenom: pterosaurs!

Here are some cool links from the past week: 

Have a great weekend! 

@karim.mustafa got up close with an Allosaurus in the Hall of Saurischian Dinosaurs #InsideAMNH
Learn more about the #InsideAMNH Instagram collaboration and follow along @amnh to see much more.

@karim.mustafa got up close with an Allosaurus in the Hall of Saurischian Dinosaurs #InsideAMNH

Learn more about the #InsideAMNH Instagram collaboration and follow along @amnh to see much more.

Sep 11

Today’s #tbt shows a picturesque view of the Museum’s 77th street entrance when the walls were covered in ivy. 
See more pictures of the Museum dating back to the 19th century, and over 7,000 archival images in our new online database Digital Special Collections.
AMNH/K12132

Today’s #tbt shows a picturesque view of the Museum’s 77th street entrance when the walls were covered in ivy. 

See more pictures of the Museum dating back to the 19th century, and over 7,000 archival images in our new online database Digital Special Collections.

AMNH/K12132

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A tabletop view in the Ichthyology collections area. Each jar and vial is filled with fish specimens from the research collection. Snapped by @samthecobra for #InsideAMNH.
Learn more about the #InsideAMNH Instagram collaboration and follow along @amnh to see much more.

A tabletop view in the Ichthyology collections area. Each jar and vial is filled with fish specimens from the research collection. Snapped by @samthecobra for #InsideAMNH.

Learn more about the #InsideAMNH Instagram collaboration and follow along @amnh to see much more.

Sep 10

New Research Identifies Drivers of Rich Bird Diversity in Neotropics
An international team of researchers is challenging a commonly held view that explains how so many species of birds came to inhabit the Neotropics, an area rich in rain forest that extends from Mexico to the southernmost tip of South America. The new research, published today in the journal Nature and co-led by Brian Smith, an assistant curator in the Museum’s Division of Vertebrate Zoology, suggests that tropical bird speciation is not directly linked to geological and climate changes, as traditionally thought. Instead, it is driven by movements of birds across physical barriers such as mountains and rivers that occur long after those landscapes’ geological origins.
"The Neotropic zone has more species of birds than any other region on Earth," said Smith, who started this work as a postdoctoral researcher at Louisiana State University. "The unanswered question has been—how did this extraordinary bird diversity originate?"
Read the full story.

New Research Identifies Drivers of Rich Bird Diversity in Neotropics

An international team of researchers is challenging a commonly held view that explains how so many species of birds came to inhabit the Neotropics, an area rich in rain forest that extends from Mexico to the southernmost tip of South America. The new research, published today in the journal Nature and co-led by Brian Smith, an assistant curator in the Museum’s Division of Vertebrate Zoology, suggests that tropical bird speciation is not directly linked to geological and climate changes, as traditionally thought. Instead, it is driven by movements of birds across physical barriers such as mountains and rivers that occur long after those landscapes’ geological origins.

"The Neotropic zone has more species of birds than any other region on Earth," said Smith, who started this work as a postdoctoral researcher at Louisiana State University. "The unanswered question has been—how did this extraordinary bird diversity originate?"

Read the full story.

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Silhouettes in the Hall of Biodiversity, beautifully captured by @jnsilva for #InsideAMNH.
Learn more about the #InsideAMNH Instagram collaboration and follow along @amnh to see much more.

Silhouettes in the Hall of Biodiversity, beautifully captured by @jnsilva for #InsideAMNH.

Learn more about the #InsideAMNH Instagram collaboration and follow along @amnh to see much more.

Sep 09

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