American Museum of Natural History

Oct 01

[video]

Sep 30

In the Ichthyology collections area, shelf after shelf is filled with fish specimens from around the world. Photographed by @dave.krugman #InsideAMNH

In the Ichthyology collections area, shelf after shelf is filled with fish specimens from around the world. Photographed by @dave.krugman #InsideAMNH

[video]

Sep 29

[video]

The manatee diorama in the Milstein Hall of Ocean Life. Photographed #InsideAMNH by @jmsuarez_

The manatee diorama in the Milstein Hall of Ocean Life. Photographed #InsideAMNH by @jmsuarez_

   Osborn Caribou - September, Level Mountain, British Columbia, Canada
Caribou, also known as reindeer, flourish in some of the world’s harshest places. Their principal home is tundra—land that is too cold for trees to grow. Massive herds of caribou migrate across the vast tundra plains of the Arctic. Smaller herds dwell in alpine tundra, which is found on top of high mountains.
In September, the mating season for caribou, called the rut, has begun. Herd members  are gathering in the open so they can find and compete for mates. At any other time of year, these two females and the juvenile (left) would probably avoid males (right). 

Two caribou here have not yet shed their antlers’ velvet. This fuzzy, blood-rich sheath of skin nourishes growth of the bone beneath. Caribou drop their antlers after the rut, but if these two females become pregnant, they will probably keep their antlers all winter. Antlered mothers can better defend themselves when competing for winter food—an advantage for their developing young. 
Caribou are the only species of deer in which both sexes have antlers. This characteristic may have evolved because caribou live in open areas with few places to hide. Antlers offer good defense against predators and aggressive herd-mates.
See this diorama in the Bernard Family Hall of North American Mammals. 
 

Osborn CaribouSeptember, Level MountainBritish Columbia, Canada

Caribou, also known as reindeer, flourish in some of the world’s harshest places. Their principal home is tundra—land that is too cold for trees to grow. Massive herds of caribou migrate across the vast tundra plains of the Arctic. Smaller herds dwell in alpine tundra, which is found on top of high mountains.

In September, the mating season for caribou, called the rut, has begun. Herd members  are gathering in the open so they can find and compete for mates. At any other time of year, these two females and the juvenile (left) would probably avoid males (right). 

Two caribou here have not yet shed their antlers’ velvet. This fuzzy, blood-rich sheath of skin nourishes growth of the bone beneath. Caribou drop their antlers after the rut, but if these two females become pregnant, they will probably keep their antlers all winter. Antlered mothers can better defend themselves when competing for winter food—an advantage for their developing young. 

Caribou are the only species of deer in which both sexes have antlers. This characteristic may have evolved because caribou live in open areas with few places to hide. Antlers offer good defense against predators and aggressive herd-mates.

See this diorama in the Bernard Family Hall of North American Mammals. 

 

Sep 28

[video]

At 5:45 pm, the last stragglers leave the Museum and the Theodore Roosevelt Rotunda becomes very quiet…at least until 10 am the next day. This picture was taken by samthecobra for the #InsideAMNH collaboration.
Learn more about the #InsideAMNH Instagram collaboration and follow along @amnh to see much more.

At 5:45 pm, the last stragglers leave the Museum and the Theodore Roosevelt Rotunda becomes very quiet…at least until 10 am the next day. This picture was taken by samthecobra for the #InsideAMNH collaboration.

Learn more about the #InsideAMNH Instagram collaboration and follow along @amnh to see much more.

[video]

Sep 27

kmustafa snaps stag beetles behind the scenes in the Invertebrate Zoology collections area for the #InsideAMNH collaboration.
Learn more about the #InsideAMNH Instagram collaboration and follow along @amnh to see much more.

kmustafa snaps stag beetles behind the scenes in the Invertebrate Zoology collections area for the #InsideAMNH collaboration.

Learn more about the #InsideAMNH Instagram collaboration and follow along @amnh to see much more.

[video]

[video]

Sep 26

It’s a fishy #FossilFriday!
Vinctifer comptoni lived around 110 million years ago in the Romualdo Formation, in what is now Brazil. Although most of its close relatives are sharp-toothed predators, Vinctifer comptoni was a filter feeder. One clue it was not a hunter is the lack of teeth, and instead had enlarged gill rakers. These long, comblike bones were apparently used to filter small animals from the water, which were then swallowed.
Want to feel this fish? It is on display in the current exhibition Pterosaurs: Flight in the Age of Dinosaurs, and the public is invited to touch it! 

It’s a fishy #FossilFriday!

Vinctifer comptoni lived around 110 million years ago in the Romualdo Formation, in what is now Brazil. Although most of its close relatives are sharp-toothed predators, Vinctifer comptoni was a filter feeder. One clue it was not a hunter is the lack of teeth, and instead had enlarged gill rakers. These long, comblike bones were apparently used to filter small animals from the water, which were then swallowed.

Want to feel this fish? It is on display in the current exhibition Pterosaurs: Flight in the Age of Dinosaurs, and the public is invited to touch it! 

[video]

Oh boy, the weekend is here! Head to the Museum and explore your world, from the deep sea to outer space. 
Here are some highlights from the past week:
We welcomed autumn to the Northern Hemisphere at 10:29 pm, 9/22.
Four Museum scientists departed on an expedition to Papua New Guinea.
New research focuses on a "hidden gem" in Einstein’s 1916 theory of general relativity.
The New York Times profiled Museum Ornithologist Rocky Rockwell and his insights into the changing diet of polar bears.
Enjoy a video and podcast from the Museum’s recent expedition to Madagascar in search of snakes.
Have a great weekend!
GIF from 1920’s Museum archival footage.

Oh boy, the weekend is here! Head to the Museum and explore your world, from the deep sea to outer space. 

Here are some highlights from the past week:

Have a great weekend!

GIF from 1920’s Museum archival footage.