1. thecreatorsprojecta group that celebrates artists who are using technology in innovative ways, got an in-depth look into the making of the new Hayden Planetarium Space Show Dark Universe. Their video features the team behind Dark Universe and details how they produced the stunning (and scientifically accurate) visualizations of our universe. Check it out!

  2. On April 28, New York-based artists Alexis Rockman and Mark Dion will share how the Museum’s Library collections have influenced their work. Library Director Tom Baione hosts the event to mark the launch of a new online database of digital images from the Museum Library’s collections.

Browse the rich collection of digitized archives and find what inspires you!

Image credits (from top left, clockwise)
-Bear (Mark Dion):Courtesy the artist and Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York-Rice, H. S. and Dutcher, Irving, “Children viewing Polar Bear Group, 1927.”-Forest floor (Alexis Rockman):Courtesy the artist and Sperone Westwater Gallery, New York-Rota, Alex J., “Installing models for the Forest Floor exhibit, 1958.”

    On April 28, New York-based artists Alexis Rockman and Mark Dion will share how the Museum’s Library collections have influenced their work. Library Director Tom Baione hosts the event to mark the launch of a new online database of digital images from the Museum Library’s collections.

    Browse the rich collection of digitized archives and find what inspires you!

    Image credits (from top left, clockwise)

    -Bear (Mark Dion):
    Courtesy the artist and Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York
    -Rice, H. S. and Dutcher, Irving, “Children viewing Polar Bear Group, 1927.”
    -Forest floor (Alexis Rockman):
    Courtesy the artist and Sperone Westwater Gallery, New York
    -Rota, Alex J., “Installing models for the Forest Floor exhibit, 1958.”

  3. A beautiful spring day at the American Museum of Natural History! 

    A beautiful spring day at the American Museum of Natural History! 

  4. An exceptionally well-preserved skull of a newly discovered 325-million-year-old shark-like species suggests that early cartilaginous and bony fishes have more to tell us about the early evolution of jawed vertebrates—including humans—than do modern sharks, as was previously thought.

The new study is based on shark fossil collected in Arkansas, where an ocean basin once was home to a diverse marine ecosystem. The fossilized skull of the new species Ozarcus mapesae was imaged with high-resolution x-rays at the European Synchrotron, letting the scientists “digitally dissect out the cartilage skeleton.”

Learn more about this new study.

    An exceptionally well-preserved skull of a newly discovered 325-million-year-old shark-like species suggests that early cartilaginous and bony fishes have more to tell us about the early evolution of jawed vertebrates—including humans—than do modern sharks, as was previously thought.

    The new study is based on shark fossil collected in Arkansas, where an ocean basin once was home to a diverse marine ecosystem. The fossilized skull of the new species Ozarcus mapesae was imaged with high-resolution x-rays at the European Synchrotron, letting the scientists “digitally dissect out the cartilage skeleton.”

    Learn more about this new study.

  5. From the Archives: Time exposure showing six stages at beginning of lunar eclipse, 1960.

Did you see the lunar eclipse last night? Check out the Museum’s online database of digital images for more pictures of eclipses dating as far back as 1908, and read the Sky Reporter blog to learn more about this phenomena.
AMNH/K10559

    From the Archives: Time exposure showing six stages at beginning of lunar eclipse, 1960.

    Did you see the lunar eclipse last night? Check out the Museum’s online database of digital images for more pictures of eclipses dating as far back as 1908, and read the Sky Reporter blog to learn more about this phenomena.

    AMNH/K10559

  6. As Slate pointed out, the internet loves crappytaxidermy. While we may not have much to contribute to that illustrious canon, we do know taxidermy. Our video "Modeling Animals in Habitat Dioramas" about how artists create the animal sculptures for the Museum’s famous habitat dioramas, shows what it takes to create a meticulously accurate specimen. 
Watch the video.

    As Slate pointed out, the internet loves crappytaxidermy. While we may not have much to contribute to that illustrious canon, we do know taxidermy. Our video "Modeling Animals in Habitat Dioramas" about how artists create the animal sculptures for the Museum’s famous habitat dioramas, shows what it takes to create a meticulously accurate specimen. 

    Watch the video.

  7. Museum researcher Mary Blair is blogging from Vietnam, where she’s surveying for endangered primates called slow lorises—at night. 
Read her latest post to find out what she takes into the field—and how she’s training others to spot a loris in the dark.

    Museum researcher Mary Blair is blogging from Vietnam, where she’s surveying for endangered primates called slow lorises—at night. 

    Read her latest post to find out what she takes into the field—and how she’s training others to spot a loris in the dark.

  8. The exhibition The Power of Poison delves into poison’s role in myth and legend as well as human history and health. Striped stones that resembled human eyes, known as agates, were once thought to provide special protection against poisons. The stones would be ground up and drunk in wine to cure poisoning or applied to the skin to cure snake, spider, or scorpion bites. 
Learn more about The Power of Poison.

    The exhibition The Power of Poison delves into poison’s role in myth and legend as well as human history and health. Striped stones that resembled human eyes, known as agates, were once thought to provide special protection against poisons. The stones would be ground up and drunk in wine to cure poisoning or applied to the skin to cure snake, spider, or scorpion bites. 

    Learn more about The Power of Poison.

  9. The Museum’s The Power of Poison: Be a Detective iPad app has been nominated for a 2014 Webby People’s Voice Award.  Download the free app and cast your vote here. 

    The Museum’s The Power of Poison: Be a Detective iPad app has been nominated for a 2014 Webby People’s Voice Award.  Download the free app and cast your vote here. 

  10. If the sky is clear during early morning hours of Tuesday April 15, viewers in the Eastern time zone will see a full lunar eclipse beginning at 3:07 am and ending at 4:25 am. By coincidence, that night, Mars will be the brightest it’s been since 2007 and won’t be again until 2016.
Learn more from the SKY REPORTER.

    If the sky is clear during early morning hours of Tuesday April 15, viewers in the Eastern time zone will see a full lunar eclipse beginning at 3:07 am and ending at 4:25 am. By coincidence, that night, Mars will be the brightest it’s been since 2007 and won’t be again until 2016.

    Learn more from the SKY REPORTER.