1. In 2010, after collecting DNA evidence during a four-month trip, Antonia  Florio, a graduate of the Museum’s Richard Gilder Graduate School,  discovered that three known chameleon species were actually seven distinct species. Active during the day, many chameleons roost at night. So Florio and other researchers collect them after dark using a headlamp to spot animals at the tips of blades of grass or branches of trees.
More on Museum research in Madagascar here. 
© AMNH/D. Finnin

    In 2010, after collecting DNA evidence during a four-month trip, Antonia  Florio, a graduate of the Museum’s Richard Gilder Graduate School,  discovered that three known chameleon species were actually seven distinct species. Active during the day, many chameleons roost at night. So Florio and other researchers collect them after dark using a headlamp to spot animals at the tips of blades of grass or branches of trees.

    More on Museum research in Madagascar here

    © AMNH/D. Finnin

Notes

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