1. Venomous animals have evolved a variety of mechanisms that deliver toxins to would-be predators and prey. In this video, Museum Curator Mark Siddall discusses some of the anatomical features you’ll want to avoid!

    The exhibition The Power of Poison closes August 10, plan your visit now!

  2. Wolverine - July, 11:30 pm, Nunavut, Canada
Canada’s Barren Lands are so far north that trees barely grow and the summer sun sets near midnight. This is prime wolverine country: cool, remote and with room to roam. Wolverines are tireless nomads, traveling many miles a day and scaling sheer slopes to find food and mates. Their strength and ferocity is legendary, but wolverines are choosy about what they attack.
What is a Wolverine? Although their name sounds wolfish, wolverines are not closely related to wolves. They look bearlike, but no close relation there, either. Wolverines are instead the largest member of the mustelids, or weasel family.
This diorama is located in the Bernard Family Hall of North American Mammals.

    Wolverine - July, 11:30 pm, Nunavut, Canada

    Canada’s Barren Lands are so far north that trees barely grow and the summer sun sets near midnight. This is prime wolverine country: cool, remote and with room to roam. Wolverines are tireless nomads, traveling many miles a day and scaling sheer slopes to find food and mates. Their strength and ferocity is legendary, but wolverines are choosy about what they attack.

    What is a Wolverine? Although their name sounds wolfish, wolverines are not closely related to wolves. They look bearlike, but no close relation there, either. Wolverines are instead the largest member of the mustelids, or weasel family.

    This diorama is located in the Bernard Family Hall of North American Mammals.

  3. It’s World Ocean’s Day! In celebration, we’re posting our viral video in which humpback whales and bottlenose dolphins play together. Enjoy!

  4. The Spectrum of Life, located in the Museum’s Hall of Biodiversity, is an evolutionary trip through the amazing diversity of life on Earth. The 1,500 specimens represent a wide range of bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals, from the smallest microorganisms to terrestrial and aquatic giants.
The only one of its kind in the world, this 100-foot-long installation is arranged into 28 living groups covering 3.5 billion years of evolution. Construction of this display involved scientists, artists, filmmakers, educators, and many others.

    The Spectrum of Life, located in the Museum’s Hall of Biodiversity, is an evolutionary trip through the amazing diversity of life on Earth. The 1,500 specimens represent a wide range of bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals, from the smallest microorganisms to terrestrial and aquatic giants.

    The only one of its kind in the world, this 100-foot-long installation is arranged into 28 living groups covering 3.5 billion years of evolution. Construction of this display involved scientists, artists, filmmakers, educators, and many others.

  5. Still looking for a gift for mom? Print these Mother’s Day cards, featuring an amazing mom menagerie from around the Museum! We’re sure yours will love them!
Learn about six amazing animal moms and print the cards here. 

    Still looking for a gift for mom? Print these Mother’s Day cards, featuring an amazing mom menagerie from around the Museum! We’re sure yours will love them!

    Learn about six amazing animal moms and print the cards here. 

  6. Kick off Mother’s Day weekend with this amazing animal mom menagerie! Learn the stories behind six scenes depicting the mother-child bond from around the Museum.

    Kick off Mother’s Day weekend with this amazing animal mom menagerie! Learn the stories behind six scenes depicting the mother-child bond from around the Museum.

  7. Ready for spring? We certainly are. Let this video be a brief respite from slushy NYC. Better yet, come visit The Butterfly Conservatory

  8. It’s not easy being green… But it’s awesome being yellow. Or red. Or orange, black, and white. In the natural world, many different animal species use bright colors and patterns to advertise the fact that they would make a horrible snack.

    More on warning colors in The Power of Poison

  9. There are only a few weeks left to see Penguins at the Museum’s IMAX Theater! 

    Get the details here.

  10. A mountain lion for your Monday

    A mountain lion for your Monday

  11. Spotted: Eastern cottontails browsing in a pumpkin patch

    Spotted: Eastern cottontails browsing in a pumpkin patch

  12. Mimicry is common in nature, allowing an animal or insect to sneak in closer to prey or to dupe and deflect predators by taking on a more dangerous species’ characteristics. A fascinating example of the latter can be seen in the robber fly Wyliea mydas, which mimics lethal spider wasps, Pepsis formosa and Pepsis thisbe, known as tarantula hawks.
Read more.

    Mimicry is common in nature, allowing an animal or insect to sneak in closer to prey or to dupe and deflect predators by taking on a more dangerous species’ characteristics. A fascinating example of the latter can be seen in the robber fly Wyliea mydas, which mimics lethal spider wasps, Pepsis formosa and Pepsis thisbe, known as tarantula hawks.

    Read more.

  13. Here’s Tuesday’s peek into the archives: a detail of the Serengeti plain diorama in the Akeley Hall of African Mammals.In the distance you can spot herds of wildebeests, giraffes, and zebras migrating across the plains. AMNH Library/315125

    Here’s Tuesday’s peek into the archives: a detail of the Serengeti plain diorama in the Akeley Hall of African Mammals.

    In the distance you can spot herds of wildebeests, giraffes, and zebras migrating across the plains. 

    AMNH Library/315125

  14. Spotted! A tiny mouse lemur in the Hall of Primates

    Spotted! A tiny mouse lemur in the Hall of Primates

  15. Odd as it may seem, a four-footed land mammal named Pakicetus,living some 50 million years ago in what we know as Pakistan today, bears the title of “first whale.”
Straddling the two worlds of land and sea, the wolf-sized animal was a meat eater that sometimes ate fish, according to chemical evidence. Pakicetus also exhibited characteristics of its anatomy that link it to modern cetaceans, a group made up of whales, porpoises, and dolphins.
See a resin cast of Pakicetus, based on fossils found in Pakistan, in Whales Giants of the Deep. 
Artist’s impression of Pakicetus attocki © Carl Buell, 2006

    Odd as it may seem, a four-footed land mammal named Pakicetus,living some 50 million years ago in what we know as Pakistan today, bears the title of “first whale.”

    Straddling the two worlds of land and sea, the wolf-sized animal was a meat eater that sometimes ate fish, according to chemical evidence. Pakicetus also exhibited characteristics of its anatomy that link it to modern cetaceans, a group made up of whales, porpoises, and dolphins.

    See a resin cast of Pakicetus, based on fossils found in Pakistan, in Whales Giants of the Deep

    Artist’s impression of Pakicetus attocki 
    © Carl Buell, 2006