1. Today’s peek into the archives shows us the Hall of Ocean Life, before the iconic blue whale was added. 
Photographed by Julius Kirschner, “Hall of Ocean Life, looking west from entrance, Coral Reef Group in center, 1933" predates the construction of the whale by about thirty years. 
Learn more about the process of building the 94-foot, 21,000-pound model on the Museum blog. 
AMNH/314185

    Today’s peek into the archives shows us the Hall of Ocean Life, before the iconic blue whale was added. 

    Photographed by Julius Kirschner, “Hall of Ocean Life, looking west from entrance, Coral Reef Group in center, 1933" predates the construction of the whale by about thirty years. 

    Learn more about the process of building the 94-foot, 21,000-pound model on the Museum blog. 

    AMNH/314185

  2. Today’s peek into the archives takes us back to the Museum in 1910. “Sigurd Neandross painting figure in Haida ceremonial canoe, North Pacific Hall” was photographed by Thomas Lunt. 
The Great Canoe has since been moved to the Museum’s Grand Gallery. At 63 feet long, the seaworthy Great Canoe is one of the Museum’s most popular artifacts. It was carved in the 1870s from the trunk of a single cedar tree, and features design elements from different Native American peoples of the Northwest Coast, notably Haida and Heiltsuk. 
Learn more about the history of the Great Canoe.
AMNH/33006

    Today’s peek into the archives takes us back to the Museum in 1910. “Sigurd Neandross painting figure in Haida ceremonial canoe, North Pacific Hall” was photographed by Thomas Lunt.

    The Great Canoe has since been moved to the Museum’s Grand Gallery. At 63 feet long, the seaworthy Great Canoe is one of the Museum’s most popular artifacts. It was carved in the 1870s from the trunk of a single cedar tree, and features design elements from different Native American peoples of the Northwest Coast, notably Haida and Heiltsuk.

    Learn more about the history of the Great Canoe.

    AMNH/33006

  3. Today’s peek into the archives shows us “Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Horsfall working on background of Wild Turkey Habitat Group, North American Bird Hall.” Photographed by Otis J. Wheelock in 1907. 
For more images of diorama construction and more than 7,000 other archival images, head to our new online database Digital Special Collections.
AMNH/31655

    Today’s peek into the archives shows us “Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Horsfall working on background of Wild Turkey Habitat Group, North American Bird Hall.” Photographed by Otis J. Wheelock in 1907. 

    For more images of diorama construction and more than 7,000 other archival images, head to our new online database Digital Special Collections.

    AMNH/31655

  4. Henry Fairfield Osborn, paleontologist and former president of the American Museum of Natural History, was born on this day in 1857.

    When he arrived at the Museum in 1891, the Paleontology collections began their first period of substantial growth. Osborn was responsible for hiring several outstanding vertebrate paleontologists, including William Diller Matthew, William K. Gregory, Walter Granger, Jacob Wortman, and Barnum Brown. 

    Osborne became president of the Museum in 1908, and was the first Museum president trained as a scientist. Under the guidance of H. F. Osborn, the vertebrate paleontology collections grew through many expeditions. Notable among these were the dinosaur specimens collected in the Rockies and Alberta by Barnum Brown; the 1901 expedition to Egypt’s Fayum Basin; and the Central Asiatic Expeditions of the 1920s. Osborne served as the Museum president for 25 years.

    See pictures of Henry Fairfield Osborn in the Digital Special Collections.

  5. From the archives: “Visitor viewing ocean sunfish, Hall of Fishes” photographed by Thane L. Bierwert in 1948. 
Find this and more than 7,000 other archival images on our new online database Digital Special Collections.
AMNH/320512

    From the archives: “Visitor viewing ocean sunfish, Hall of Fishes” photographed by Thane L. Bierwert in 1948. 

    Find this and more than 7,000 other archival images on our new online database Digital Special Collections.

    AMNH/320512

  6. Are you going camping this summer? Check out images from our Digital Special Collections for some classic tent inspiration, from Museum expeditions, to indigenous campsites. 

    Browse images. 

  7. Today’s peek into the archives takes us back to class. 
Part of the Museum’s Lantern Slide Collection, “Mrs. Burns showing horned toad to class, Nature Room, American Museum of Natural History” was photographed in 1928. 
To expand the Museum’s educational mission beyond its walls, a lantern slide lending library was created and formed the basis of the Natural Science Study Collections which the Museum delivered to New York schools. 
See more of the Lantern Slide Collection. 
AMNH/LS306-29

    Today’s peek into the archives takes us back to class. 

    Part of the Museum’s Lantern Slide Collection, “Mrs. Burns showing horned toad to class, Nature Room, American Museum of Natural History” was photographed in 1928. 

    To expand the Museum’s educational mission beyond its walls, a lantern slide lending library was created and formed the basis of the Natural Science Study Collections which the Museum delivered to New York schools. 

    See more of the Lantern Slide Collection

    AMNH/LS306-29

  8. "Fish jumping, Turners River, Florida"
This beautiful photo was taken by Julian A. Dimock in 1908. Dimock, who donated over 3,400 photographic negatives to the Museum in 1920, traveled the Southern states over many years during Museum funded trips to Southern locations like The Everglades. Carrying heavy and cumbersome photographic equipment over challenging terrain, Dimock trained his lens on the people and landscape of the South. 
See more of the Julian Dimock Collection in our Digital Special Collections. 

    "Fish jumping, Turners River, Florida"

    This beautiful photo was taken by Julian A. Dimock in 1908. Dimock, who donated over 3,400 photographic negatives to the Museum in 1920, traveled the Southern states over many years during Museum funded trips to Southern locations like The Everglades. Carrying heavy and cumbersome photographic equipment over challenging terrain, Dimock trained his lens on the people and landscape of the South. 

    See more of the Julian Dimock Collection in our Digital Special Collections

  9. North American Beaver - July evening, Central Michigan
The beaver is not your typical rodent. It’s the largest one on the continent, and the only one that can cut down mature trees. As semiaquatic rodents, beavers have closeable ears and nostrils, webbed hind feet and very dense fur coats. Their paddlelike tails appear to be covered in scales like a fish, but they aren’t. Rather, the skin is grooved in a scaly pattern, which makes the thick tail more flexible.
Beavers can drastically alter landscapes. Working  in family groups of four to eight, a beaver colony can cut down more than a ton of trees per year. This colony has dammed a stream with logs, mud and stones to make a pond. The land is so newly flooded that some trees have not yet drowned. 
By altering streams, beavers expand wetlands , offering rich habitat for other species. Beaver ponds can also control runoff and reduce erosion. Eventually, this pond will clog with sediment. At that point, or when all accessible trees are cut, the colony will abandon its effort and begin again elsewhere.
This diorama is located in the Bernard Family Hall of North American Mammals. 

    North American Beaver - July evening, Central Michigan

    The beaver is not your typical rodent. It’s the largest one on the continent, and the only one that can cut down mature trees. As semiaquatic rodents, beavers have closeable ears and nostrils, webbed hind feet and very dense fur coats. Their paddlelike tails appear to be covered in scales like a fish, but they aren’t. Rather, the skin is grooved in a scaly pattern, which makes the thick tail more flexible.

    Beavers can drastically alter landscapes. Working  in family groups of four to eight, a beaver colony can cut down more than a ton of trees per year. This colony has dammed a stream with logs, mud and stones to make a pond. The land is so newly flooded that some trees have not yet drowned. 

    By altering streams, beavers expand wetlands , offering rich habitat for other species. Beaver ponds can also control runoff and reduce erosion. Eventually, this pond will clog with sediment. At that point, or when all accessible trees are cut, the colony will abandon its effort and begin again elsewhere.

    This diorama is located in the Bernard Family Hall of North American Mammals

  10. Today’s look into the archives shows a Museum preparator working on the mount of an East Indian ox for the Hall of Asian Mammals. 

See thousands of images from the Museum’s archives over on our Digital Special Collections website. 

AMNH/311796

    Today’s look into the archives shows a Museum preparator working on the mount of an East Indian ox for the Hall of Asian Mammals

    See thousands of images from the Museum’s archives over on our Digital Special Collections website

    AMNH/311796

  11. In celebration of our new film, Great White Shark, now playing in 3D and 2D at the Museum, today’s peek into the archives is a mouthful.
“Seated in fossil shark jaw restoration” was taken by H.S. Rice in January, 1927, after the restoration of the jaws of the fossil shark, Carcharodon megalodon. 
Learn more about the prehistoric predator, Carcharodon, and our new film, Great White Shark. 
AMNH/319969

    In celebration of our new film, Great White Shark, now playing in 3D and 2D at the Museum, today’s peek into the archives is a mouthful.

    Seated in fossil shark jaw restoration” was taken by H.S. Rice in January, 1927, after the restoration of the jaws of the fossil shark, Carcharodon megalodon

    Learn more about the prehistoric predator, Carcharodon, and our new film, Great White Shark

    AMNH/319969

  12. Today’s peek into the archives takes us to the beach!
“Alligator walking on beach, Cape Romano, Florida, 1907" was photographed by Julian A. Dimock, and is part of the Museum’s collection of over 3,400 images taken by Dimock in the United States in the early part of the 20th century from about 1904 to 1911. He traveled the Southern states on Museum funded trips to Southern locations like The Everglades. Carrying heavy and cumbersome photographic equipment over challenging terrain, Dimock trained his lens on the people and landscape of the South, to great effect. 
See the Julian A. Dimock Collection.
AMNH/46784

    Today’s peek into the archives takes us to the beach!

    Alligator walking on beach, Cape Romano, Florida, 1907" was photographed by Julian A. Dimock, and is part of the Museum’s collection of over 3,400 images taken by Dimock in the United States in the early part of the 20th century from about 1904 to 1911. He traveled the Southern states on Museum funded trips to Southern locations like The Everglades. Carrying heavy and cumbersome photographic equipment over challenging terrain, Dimock trained his lens on the people and landscape of the South, to great effect. 

    See the Julian A. Dimock Collection.

    AMNH/46784

  13.  
From the archives: visitors enjoy an early version of an audio guide. Photographed by Lee Boltin, “Using Guide-a-phone" was taken in the Whitney Hall of Oceanic Birds in 1954. 

     
    From the archives: visitors enjoy an early version of an audio guide. Photographed by Lee Boltin, “Using Guide-a-phone" was taken in the Whitney Hall of Oceanic Birds in 1954. 

  14. Today’s peek into the archives is for the birds.
“Raymond B. Potter preparing bird specimens for Diomede Bird Group" was photographed by Irving Dutcher in 1930. Find this and more than 7,000 other archival images on our new online database Digital Special Collections.

AMNH/313113

    Today’s peek into the archives is for the birds.

    Raymond B. Potter preparing bird specimens for Diomede Bird Group" was photographed by Irving Dutcher in 1930. Find this and more than 7,000 other archival images on our new online database Digital Special Collections.

    AMNH/313113

  15. "Early June" from the display Seasons on the Farm, located in the Felix M. Warburg Hall of New York State Environment. 

    "Early June" from the display Seasons on the Farm, located in the Felix M. Warburg Hall of New York State Environment.