1. Ready for spring? We certainly are. Let this video be a brief respite from slushy NYC. Better yet, come visit The Butterfly Conservatory

  2. It’s not easy being green… But it’s awesome being yellow. Or red. Or orange, black, and white. In the natural world, many different animal species use bright colors and patterns to advertise the fact that they would make a horrible snack.

    More on warning colors in The Power of Poison

  3. There are only a few weeks left to see Penguins at the Museum’s IMAX Theater! 

    Get the details here.

  4. A mountain lion for your Monday

    A mountain lion for your Monday

  5. Spotted: Eastern cottontails browsing in a pumpkin patch

    Spotted: Eastern cottontails browsing in a pumpkin patch

  6. Mimicry is common in nature, allowing an animal or insect to sneak in closer to prey or to dupe and deflect predators by taking on a more dangerous species’ characteristics. A fascinating example of the latter can be seen in the robber fly Wyliea mydas, which mimics lethal spider wasps, Pepsis formosa and Pepsis thisbe, known as tarantula hawks.
Read more.

    Mimicry is common in nature, allowing an animal or insect to sneak in closer to prey or to dupe and deflect predators by taking on a more dangerous species’ characteristics. A fascinating example of the latter can be seen in the robber fly Wyliea mydas, which mimics lethal spider wasps, Pepsis formosa and Pepsis thisbe, known as tarantula hawks.

    Read more.

  7. Here’s Tuesday’s peek into the archives: a detail of the Serengeti plain diorama in the Akeley Hall of African Mammals.In the distance you can spot herds of wildebeests, giraffes, and zebras migrating across the plains. AMNH Library/315125

    Here’s Tuesday’s peek into the archives: a detail of the Serengeti plain diorama in the Akeley Hall of African Mammals.

    In the distance you can spot herds of wildebeests, giraffes, and zebras migrating across the plains. 

    AMNH Library/315125

  8. Spotted! A tiny mouse lemur in the Hall of Primates

    Spotted! A tiny mouse lemur in the Hall of Primates

  9. Odd as it may seem, a four-footed land mammal named Pakicetus,living some 50 million years ago in what we know as Pakistan today, bears the title of “first whale.”
Straddling the two worlds of land and sea, the wolf-sized animal was a meat eater that sometimes ate fish, according to chemical evidence. Pakicetus also exhibited characteristics of its anatomy that link it to modern cetaceans, a group made up of whales, porpoises, and dolphins.
See a resin cast of Pakicetus, based on fossils found in Pakistan, in Whales Giants of the Deep. 
Artist’s impression of Pakicetus attocki © Carl Buell, 2006

    Odd as it may seem, a four-footed land mammal named Pakicetus,living some 50 million years ago in what we know as Pakistan today, bears the title of “first whale.”

    Straddling the two worlds of land and sea, the wolf-sized animal was a meat eater that sometimes ate fish, according to chemical evidence. Pakicetus also exhibited characteristics of its anatomy that link it to modern cetaceans, a group made up of whales, porpoises, and dolphins.

    See a resin cast of Pakicetus, based on fossils found in Pakistan, in Whales Giants of the Deep

    Artist’s impression of Pakicetus attocki 
    © Carl Buell, 2006

  10. In the 1970s and early 1980s, Museum herpetologist Charles W. Myers made several expeditions a year to the Colombian rain forest, not far from the Pacific coast. Myers was there studying a particularly charismatic group of amphibians: exuberantly colored small frogs from the family Dendrobatidae, which could be spotted dotting the bromeliads and rocky streams of the jungle.
Although dendrobatids may be beautiful, these tropical Central and South American frogs are also very, very poisonous.
© AMNH/T. Grant

    In the 1970s and early 1980s, Museum herpetologist Charles W. Myers made several expeditions a year to the Colombian rain forest, not far from the Pacific coast. Myers was there studying a particularly charismatic group of amphibians: exuberantly colored small frogs from the family Dendrobatidae, which could be spotted dotting the bromeliads and rocky streams of the jungle.

    Although dendrobatids may be beautiful, these tropical Central and South American frogs are also very, very poisonous.

    © AMNH/T. Grant