Posts tagged dinosaur

47 posts tagged dinosaur

Happy #NationalFossilDay! Can you tell which of the above are dinosaur teeth? Below are the answers.
Clockwise from top:
Tyrannosaurus rex tooth (Late Cretaceous, western US) 
Tyrannosaur tooth (Late Cretaceous, Judith River, MT) 
Rugose coral (Middle Devonian, Falls of the Ohio, Clarksville, Indiana) 
Rugose coral (Paleozoic, locality unknown) 
Ornithomimid toe claw (Late Cretaceous, western US)
Rugose coral (Paleozoic, locality unknown)
Tyrannosaur tooth (Late Cretaceous, Judith River, MT) 
Rugose coral (Paleozoic, locality unknown)
Theropod tooth (Late Cretaceous, Ojo Alamo, NM) 
Tyrannosaur toe claw (Late Cretaceous, western US). 
All are fossils except, technically, the T. rex tooth at the top, which is actually a cast of a real tooth. The rugose corals (also known as solitary or horn corals) are very often mistaken for dinosaur teeth but are older than the oldest dinosaurs, having gone extinct around 250 million years ago (the oldest known dinosaurs are around 230 million years old).
Learn more on the Museum’s Division of Paleontology website. 

Happy #NationalFossilDay! Can you tell which of the above are dinosaur teeth? Below are the answers.

Clockwise from top:

  • Tyrannosaurus rex tooth (Late Cretaceous, western US)
  • Tyrannosaur tooth (Late Cretaceous, Judith River, MT)
  • Rugose coral (Middle Devonian, Falls of the Ohio, Clarksville, Indiana)
  • Rugose coral (Paleozoic, locality unknown)
  • Ornithomimid toe claw (Late Cretaceous, western US)
  • Rugose coral (Paleozoic, locality unknown)
  • Tyrannosaur tooth (Late Cretaceous, Judith River, MT)
  • Rugose coral (Paleozoic, locality unknown)
  • Theropod tooth (Late Cretaceous, Ojo Alamo, NM)
  • Tyrannosaur toe claw (Late Cretaceous, western US). 

All are fossils except, technically, the T. rex tooth at the top, which is actually a cast of a real tooth. The rugose corals (also known as solitary or horn corals) are very often mistaken for dinosaur teeth but are older than the oldest dinosaurs, having gone extinct around 250 million years ago (the oldest known dinosaurs are around 230 million years old).

Learn more on the Museum’s Division of Paleontology website

This specimen at the Museum is the only real fossil Deinonychus, a non-avian maniraptor, on display in the world.
With its sickle claws and sharp teeth, Deinonychus was likely a formidable predator. Its extremely advanced wrists and shoulders provide strong additional evidence for the hypothesis that birds are a kind of dinosaurs.
jnsilva photographed this fossil in the Hall of Saurischian Dinosaurs.

This specimen at the Museum is the only real fossil Deinonychus, a non-avian maniraptor, on display in the world.

With its sickle claws and sharp teeth, Deinonychus was likely a formidable predator. Its extremely advanced wrists and shoulders provide strong additional evidence for the hypothesis that birds are a kind of dinosaurs.

jnsilva photographed this fossil in the Hall of Saurischian Dinosaurs.

A prosauropod for Fossil Friday!
This is Plateosaurus trossingensis, a dinosaur that lived in the Late Triassic, roughly 210 million years ago. With more than 100 skeletons collected in western Europe and Greenland, it is the best-known prosauropod dinosaur. Skeletons of Plateosaurus, including this one, are sometimes found in death assemblages, indicating that a whole herd may have died from some cataclysmic event. 
Did you know? Prosauropods have been found on every continent, including Antarctica! They probably moved around on their hind legs (bipedally) sometimes, and on all 4 legs (quadrupedally) at other times. 
This fossil is located in the Hall of Saurischian Dinosaurs. 

A prosauropod for Fossil Friday!

This is Plateosaurus trossingensis, a dinosaur that lived in the Late Triassic, roughly 210 million years ago. With more than 100 skeletons collected in western Europe and Greenland, it is the best-known prosauropod dinosaur. Skeletons of Plateosaurus, including this one, are sometimes found in death assemblages, indicating that a whole herd may have died from some cataclysmic event. 

Did you know? Prosauropods have been found on every continent, including Antarctica! They probably moved around on their hind legs (bipedally) sometimes, and on all 4 legs (quadrupedally) at other times. 

This fossil is located in the Hall of Saurischian Dinosaurs

Recognize this dinosaur? The sight of the attacking Allosaurus greets visitors when they enter the Rotunda. In this imagined prehistoric encounter, the 140-million-year-old predator faces off against a Barosaurus, rearing up to protect its young. Shot by @karim.mustafa for #InsideAMNH.
Learn more about the #InsideAMNH Instagram collaboration and follow along @amnh to see much more.

Recognize this dinosaur? The sight of the attacking Allosaurus greets visitors when they enter the Rotunda. In this imagined prehistoric encounter, the 140-million-year-old predator faces off against a Barosaurus, rearing up to protect its young. Shot by @karim.mustafa for #InsideAMNH.

Learn more about the #InsideAMNH Instagram collaboration and follow along @amnh to see much more.

Corythosaurus
ZoomInfo
Skeleton of Corythosaurus, duck-bill dinosaurs exhibit, Cretaceous Hall, 1956
AMNH/324088
ZoomInfo

Corythosaurus is a member of the group of duck-billed dinosaurs called hadrosaurs, which walked and ran on their two hind legs. The species’ strange skull is capped by a crescent-shaped helmet that contains extended tubes, which formed elaborate nasal passages.

Collected in 1912 in Alberta, Canada, this Corythosaurus is among the finest dinosaur specimens ever found. The preservation of fossilized skin impressions and a meshwork of calcified tendons that stiffened the tall vertebrae make it a rare find.

This specimen is located in the Hall of Ornithischian Dinosaurs.

Don’t get too close, this #fossilfriday has spikes!
This heavily armored, highly spiked ankylosaur is Edmontonia rugosidens, a dinosaur that lived 75 million years ago in the Late Cretaceous period. This mount shows the front limb positioned as it may have been in life. Although it certainly wasn’t a sprinter, Edmontonia could probably move quickly.
Find this fossil in the Museum’s Hall of Ornithischian Dinosaurs.

Don’t get too close, this #fossilfriday has spikes!

This heavily armored, highly spiked ankylosaur is Edmontonia rugosidens, a dinosaur that lived 75 million years ago in the Late Cretaceous period. This mount shows the front limb positioned as it may have been in life. Although it certainly wasn’t a sprinter, Edmontonia could probably move quickly.

Find this fossil in the Museum’s Hall of Ornithischian Dinosaurs.

Today’s peek into the archives shows a truly hands-on approach to learning about dinosaurs. “Children viewing Brontosaurus exhibit” by H. S. Rice and Irving Dutcher was taken in 1927. Brontosaurus is no longer used by paleontologists to refer to this massive herbivorous species, which was originally thought to be distinct from—but turned out to be the same as—the Apatosaurus. Nearly a century after this specimen was first mounted at the Museum, it underwent a major revision, including a replacement of its skull. Learn more about the history of this dino misnomer.AMNH/312229

Today’s peek into the archives shows a truly hands-on approach to learning about dinosaurs. “Children viewing Brontosaurus exhibit” by H. S. Rice and Irving Dutcher was taken in 1927. 

Brontosaurus is no longer used by paleontologists to refer to this massive herbivorous species, which was originally thought to be distinct from—but turned out to be the same as—the Apatosaurus. Nearly a century after this specimen was first mounted at the Museum, it underwent a major revision, including a replacement of its skull. 
Learn more about the history of this dino misnomer.

AMNH/312229

A diorama in the Pterosaurs: Flight in the Age of Dinosaurs exhibition brings to life a scene from the Romualdo Formation from a time when pterosaurs ruled the skies and hunted for fish along an ancient coast.
    Curators created the scene based on fossils found at the Araripe Basin in Brazil. Many are beautifully preserved, immediately recognizable as the animals they once were. The fossils are also of particular geological interest because they date from a time—110 million years ago—when the continents weren’t in the same positions as they are today. South America was only starting to split off from Africa, and a north-south seaway may have run down through today’s Brazil, including through the Romualdo. 
Learn more about this prehistoric scene.

A diorama in the Pterosaurs: Flight in the Age of Dinosaurs exhibition brings to life a scene from the Romualdo Formation from a time when pterosaurs ruled the skies and hunted for fish along an ancient coast.

Curators created the scene based on fossils found at the Araripe Basin in Brazil. Many are beautifully preserved, immediately recognizable as the animals they once were. The fossils are also of particular geological interest because they date from a time—110 million years ago—when the continents weren’t in the same positions as they are today. South America was only starting to split off from Africa, and a north-south seaway may have run down through today’s Brazil, including through the Romualdo. 

Learn more about this prehistoric scene.

Last Summer, a team from the Museum’s Paleontology Division went looking for fossils in the Gobi Desert. The group included Aki Watanabe, a student at the Museum’s Richard Gilder Graduate School, who was chosen as a beta-tester for Google Glass.

In this video, Watanabe shows his first find: a fossil dinosaur nest! See how Watanabe extracts the eggs and nest to package it for its return to the lab for further study.

Learn more.

Neither birds nor bats, pterosaurs were reptiles, close cousins of dinosaurs who evolved on a separate branch of the reptile family tree. They were also the first animals after insects to evolve powered flight—not just leaping or gliding, but flapping their wings to generate lift and travel through the air. They evolved into dozens of species. Some were as large as an F-16 fighter jet, and others as small as a paper airplane.

Pterosaurs: Flight in the Age of Dinosaurs opens April 6.

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