1. Don’t get too close, this #fossilfriday has spikes!
This heavily armored, highly spiked ankylosaur is Edmontonia rugosidens, a dinosaur that lived 75 million years ago in the Late Cretaceous period. This mount shows the front limb positioned as it may have been in life. Although it certainly wasn’t a sprinter, Edmontonia could probably move quickly.
Find this fossil in the Museum’s Hall of Ornithischian Dinosaurs.

    Don’t get too close, this #fossilfriday has spikes!

    This heavily armored, highly spiked ankylosaur is Edmontonia rugosidens, a dinosaur that lived 75 million years ago in the Late Cretaceous period. This mount shows the front limb positioned as it may have been in life. Although it certainly wasn’t a sprinter, Edmontonia could probably move quickly.

    Find this fossil in the Museum’s Hall of Ornithischian Dinosaurs.

  2. An allosaurus for your #fossilfriday! 
This saurischian dinosaur is shown feeding on a carcass with bones marked by grooves, possibly from the teeth or claws of the 140-million-year-old predator. Allosaurus teeth found nearby inspired the idea for the mount. This allosaurus can be found in the Museum’s Hall of Saurischian Dinosaurs. 
Learn more.

    An allosaurus for your #fossilfriday! 

    This saurischian dinosaur is shown feeding on a carcass with bones marked by grooves, possibly from the teeth or claws of the 140-million-year-old predator. Allosaurus teeth found nearby inspired the idea for the mount. This allosaurus can be found in the Museum’s Hall of Saurischian Dinosaurs

    Learn more.

  3. Today’s peek into the archives shows a truly hands-on approach to learning about dinosaurs. “Children viewing Brontosaurus exhibit” by H. S. Rice and Irving Dutcher was taken in 1927. Brontosaurus is no longer used by paleontologists to refer to this massive herbivorous species, which was originally thought to be distinct from—but turned out to be the same as—the Apatosaurus. Nearly a century after this specimen was first mounted at the Museum, it underwent a major revision, including a replacement of its skull. Learn more about the history of this dino misnomer.AMNH/312229

    Today’s peek into the archives shows a truly hands-on approach to learning about dinosaurs. “Children viewing Brontosaurus exhibit” by H. S. Rice and Irving Dutcher was taken in 1927. 

    Brontosaurus is no longer used by paleontologists to refer to this massive herbivorous species, which was originally thought to be distinct from—but turned out to be the same as—the Apatosaurus. Nearly a century after this specimen was first mounted at the Museum, it underwent a major revision, including a replacement of its skull. 
    Learn more about the history of this dino misnomer.

    AMNH/312229

  4. A diorama in the Pterosaurs: Flight in the Age of Dinosaurs exhibition brings to life a scene from the Romualdo Formation from a time when pterosaurs ruled the skies and hunted for fish along an ancient coast.
    Curators created the scene based on fossils found at the Araripe Basin in Brazil. Many are beautifully preserved, immediately recognizable as the animals they once were. The fossils are also of particular geological interest because they date from a time—110 million years ago—when the continents weren’t in the same positions as they are today. South America was only starting to split off from Africa, and a north-south seaway may have run down through today’s Brazil, including through the Romualdo. 
Learn more about this prehistoric scene.

    A diorama in the Pterosaurs: Flight in the Age of Dinosaurs exhibition brings to life a scene from the Romualdo Formation from a time when pterosaurs ruled the skies and hunted for fish along an ancient coast.

    Curators created the scene based on fossils found at the Araripe Basin in Brazil. Many are beautifully preserved, immediately recognizable as the animals they once were. The fossils are also of particular geological interest because they date from a time—110 million years ago—when the continents weren’t in the same positions as they are today. South America was only starting to split off from Africa, and a north-south seaway may have run down through today’s Brazil, including through the Romualdo. 

    Learn more about this prehistoric scene.

  5. Last Summer, a team from the Museum’s Paleontology Division went looking for fossils in the Gobi Desert. The group included Aki Watanabe, a student at the Museum’s Richard Gilder Graduate School, who was chosen as a beta-tester for Google Glass.

    In this video, Watanabe shows his first find: a fossil dinosaur nest! See how Watanabe extracts the eggs and nest to package it for its return to the lab for further study.

    Learn more.

  6. From the Archives: Museum photographer Thane L. Biewert photographs a colleague photographing Tyrannosaurus rex. (1937) 
Barnum Brown, known as the greatest dinosaur collector of all time, discovered and excavated this specimen starting in 1902. Learn about Brown’s extraordinary career.
Browse more images from the archives.AMNH/315293

    From the Archives: Museum photographer Thane L. Biewert photographs a colleague photographing Tyrannosaurus rex. (1937)

    Barnum Brown, known as the greatest dinosaur collector of all time, discovered and excavated this specimen starting in 1902. 
    Learn about Brown’s extraordinary career.

    Browse more images from the archives.
    AMNH/315293

  7. Neither birds nor bats, pterosaurs were reptiles, close cousins of dinosaurs who evolved on a separate branch of the reptile family tree. They were also the first animals after insects to evolve powered flight—not just leaping or gliding, but flapping their wings to generate lift and travel through the air. They evolved into dozens of species. Some were as large as an F-16 fighter jet, and others as small as a paper airplane.

    Pterosaurs: Flight in the Age of Dinosaurs opens April 6.

  8. Find this spectacular Stegosaurus in the Hall of Ornithischian Dinosaurs.

    Find this spectacular Stegosaurus in the Hall of Ornithischian Dinosaurs.

  9. From the archives: Charles Lang and Otto Faulkenbach working on a Triceratops model, 1938
Explore the Museum’s digital archives here. 
AMNH Library/315711

    From the archives: Charles Lang and Otto Faulkenbach working on a Triceratops model, 1938

    Explore the Museum’s digital archives here

    AMNH Library/315711

  10. 


From the archives: ““Haplocanthosaurus leg bones arranged in position, Vertebrate Paleontology Lab” (Date unknown)AMNH Library/335831

    From the archives: ““Haplocanthosaurus leg bones arranged in position, Vertebrate Paleontology Lab” (Date unknown)

    AMNH Library/335831

  11. Snow day!

    Snow day!

  12. Watch: Folding a Dinosaur

    Watch: Folding a Dinosaur

  13. Happy National Fossil Day!

    Happy National Fossil Day!

  14. This summer, a group of summer campers went behind the scenes of the Museum to scan, analyze, and model 50 different dinosaur bones.

    The results: a 3D-printed dinosaur.

    Read all about the process on Gizmodo.