1. A diorama in the Pterosaurs: Flight in the Age of Dinosaurs exhibition brings to life a scene from the Romualdo Formation from a time when pterosaurs ruled the skies and hunted for fish along an ancient coast.
    Curators created the scene based on fossils found at the Araripe Basin in Brazil. Many are beautifully preserved, immediately recognizable as the animals they once were. The fossils are also of particular geological interest because they date from a time—110 million years ago—when the continents weren’t in the same positions as they are today. South America was only starting to split off from Africa, and a north-south seaway may have run down through today’s Brazil, including through the Romualdo. 
Learn more about this prehistoric scene.

    A diorama in the Pterosaurs: Flight in the Age of Dinosaurs exhibition brings to life a scene from the Romualdo Formation from a time when pterosaurs ruled the skies and hunted for fish along an ancient coast.

    Curators created the scene based on fossils found at the Araripe Basin in Brazil. Many are beautifully preserved, immediately recognizable as the animals they once were. The fossils are also of particular geological interest because they date from a time—110 million years ago—when the continents weren’t in the same positions as they are today. South America was only starting to split off from Africa, and a north-south seaway may have run down through today’s Brazil, including through the Romualdo. 

    Learn more about this prehistoric scene.

  2. This groundhog is ready for warmer days.
Native to Canada and the Eastern United States, groundhogs live in fields and forests. Some even maintain two homes: a summer den in a meadow and a winter burrow in the woods. 
See the diorama in the Bernard Family Hall of North American Mammals. 

    This groundhog is ready for warmer days.

    Native to Canada and the Eastern United States, groundhogs live in fields and forests. Some even maintain two homes: a summer den in a meadow and a winter burrow in the woods. 

    See the diorama in the Bernard Family Hall of North American Mammals

  3. Flying fish in the dolphin and tuna diorama, Milstein Hall of Ocean Life

    Flying fish in the dolphin and tuna diorama, Milstein Hall of Ocean Life

  4. Alright science nerds, can you identify this species?
(Hint: The answer is here)
via #DIORAMA from PBS Digital Studios

    Alright science nerds, can you identify this species?

    (Hint: The answer is here)

    via #DIORAMA from PBS Digital Studios

  5. Before the Andros coral reef diorama was installed in the Museum’s Hall of Ocean Life, scientists and artists did extensive research in the field. Artists even used waterproof paints to draw and document the underwater scene.
See footage from the 1930s in the latest DIORAMA video from PBS Digital Studios.

    Before the Andros coral reef diorama was installed in the Museum’s Hall of Ocean Life, scientists and artists did extensive research in the field. Artists even used waterproof paints to draw and document the underwater scene.

    See footage from the 1930s in the latest DIORAMA video from PBS Digital Studios.

  6. Need a break from the cold? Head to the Bahamas to see how artists and scientists created the Andros Coral Reef diorama.
Watch the latest video in the DIORAMA series, a collaboration with PBS Digital Studios .

    Need a break from the cold? Head to the Bahamas to see how artists and scientists created the Andros Coral Reef diorama.

    Watch the latest video in the DIORAMA series, a collaboration with PBS Digital Studios .

  7. In today’s peek into the archives, Raymond Potter mounts a Bird of Paradise (1945).Learn more about the bird habitat dioramas and the history of ornithology at the Museum in a new video series.AMNH Library/298479

    In today’s peek into the archives, Raymond Potter mounts a Bird of Paradise (1945).

    Learn more about the bird habitat dioramas and the history of ornithology at the Museum in a new video series.

    AMNH Library/298479

  8. Long before sophisticated wildlife photography, artists in the field captured the color and movement of birds for the background paintings of the Museum’s dioramas. Similarly, bird taxidermists studied their subjects’ anatomy and behavior to achieve a natural effect, most dramatically in flight.

    Here, long-time exhibition artist Stephen C. Quinn explores the work of painters Louis Agassiz Fuertes and Francis Lee Jacques and taxidermist David Schwendeman.

  9. Find out what life is like inside a termite nest in this new episode of DIORAMA, a collaboration with PBS Digital Studios and Thirteen WNET Interactive.

  10. Brandt’s Cormorant, Sanford Hall of North American Birds #birdwatching #amnh #diorama

    Brandt’s Cormorant, Sanford Hall of North American Birds #birdwatching #amnh #diorama