1. Do you use a mind-altering substance on a daily basis?
If you drink coffee, you do. Caffeine is a drug that has definite psychoactive effects and you can definitely get addicted to it. 
We recently spoke with medical toxicologist Robert Hoffman, MD, about how toxicologists define the word “drug”; basic neurochemistry behind prescription and recreational drugs; and the top tool in medical toxicology today (not necessarily the one you’ll see on TV). Read the Q&A. 
Image: Julius Schorzman

    Do you use a mind-altering substance on a daily basis?

    If you drink coffee, you do. Caffeine is a drug that has definite psychoactive effects and you can definitely get addicted to it.

    We recently spoke with medical toxicologist Robert Hoffman, MD, about how toxicologists define the word “drug”; basic neurochemistry behind prescription and recreational drugs; and the top tool in medical toxicology today (not necessarily the one you’ll see on TV). Read the Q&A. 

    Image: Julius Schorzman

  2. Happy Friday, Tumblr!
Have a great three-day weekend! 

    Happy Friday, Tumblr!

    Have a great three-day weekend! 

  3. From the collections:
In the mountains of northern Luzon in the Philippines, the Ifugao people cultivate rice on elaborate terraces with intricate irrigation systems. Some households keep carved wooden bulul figures representing mythological deities to ensure good harvests and to protect the fields and granaries. These figures are venerated and passed down for generations.
(via Wooden Ifugao Figures from Anthropology’s Philippines Collection)

    From the collections:

    In the mountains of northern Luzon in the Philippines, the Ifugao people cultivate rice on elaborate terraces with intricate irrigation systems. Some households keep carved wooden bulul figures representing mythological deities to ensure good harvests and to protect the fields and granaries. These figures are venerated and passed down for generations.

    (via Wooden Ifugao Figures from Anthropology’s Philippines Collection)

  4. In the next 30 years, the global population is estimated to surpass 9 billion people. Will there be too many people, and too little food? How will climate, politics, and economics impact food systems and food security on our growing planet?

    Last week, NBC News Chief Science and Health Correspondent Robert Bazell led a discussion here at the Museum with best-selling author Raj Patel, geneticist Molly Jahn, and award-winning chef Marcus Samuelsson. Watch the full program here.

    (via ourglobalkitchen)

  5. 
On a recent visit to Our Global Kitchen, chef and author Marcus Samuelsson shared his thoughts on some of the food policy challenges we face locally and globally. Check out the video here.
Join Samuelsson, along with Raj Patel (Stuffed and Starved, Food Rebellions, and The Value of Nothing) and geneticist Molly Jahn (former USDA Deputy Under Secretary and University of Madison-Wisconsin professor) for an exciting roundtable discussion of ideas for solving world hunger this Thursday, January 10.
For our Tumblr followers, use code FOOD to get $5 off your ticket!

(via ourglobalkitchen)

    On a recent visit to Our Global Kitchenchef and author Marcus Samuelsson shared his thoughts on some of the food policy challenges we face locally and globally. Check out the video here.

    Join Samuelsson, along with Raj Patel (Stuffed and Starved, Food Rebellions, and The Value of Nothing) and geneticist Molly Jahn (former USDA Deputy Under Secretary and University of Madison-Wisconsin professor) for an exciting roundtable discussion of ideas for solving world hunger this Thursday, January 10.

    For our Tumblr followers, use code FOOD to get $5 off your ticket!

    (via ourglobalkitchen)

  6. ourglobalkitchen:

On the cover of the first edition of Joy of Cooking, St. Martha of Bethany, the patron saint of cooking, slays the dragon of kitchen drudgery (!).
We caught up with John Becker, a great-grandson of the author, and found out some of the family’s favorite recipes from the classic cookbook (hint: they’re sweet).
(via The Joy of Cooking’s Family History)

    ourglobalkitchen:

    On the cover of the first edition of Joy of Cooking, St. Martha of Bethany, the patron saint of cooking, slays the dragon of kitchen drudgery (!).

    We caught up with John Becker, a great-grandson of the author, and found out some of the family’s favorite recipes from the classic cookbook (hint: they’re sweet).

    (via The Joy of Cooking’s Family History)

  7. A noblewoman from an illustrious family, Livia Drusilla, the wife of Augustus, first emperor of Rome, owned her own villa. Like many wealthy Romans, Livia was a passionate gardener and she is said to have cultivated her own variety of fig, known as the Liviana.
Peer inside an imaginative re-creation of her dining room in Our Global Kitchen.
© AMNH/R. Mickens

    A noblewoman from an illustrious family, Livia Drusilla, the wife of Augustus, first emperor of Rome, owned her own villa. Like many wealthy Romans, Livia was a passionate gardener and she is said to have cultivated her own variety of fig, known as the Liviana.

    Peer inside an imaginative re-creation of her dining room in Our Global Kitchen.

    © AMNH/R. Mickens

  8. ourglobalkitchen:

    Feeling hungry? How about french toast, three fried-egg sandwiches, pancakes, a five-egg omelet, and grits for breakfast?

    As a young athlete, Olympic swimmer Michael Phelps liked to visit his favorite diner and order enormous breakfasts like this one. Even after a breakfast this size, Phelps would still need more fuel for six hours of swimming, which he might complete in one day during heavy training.

    Take a look at his and other historic meals in Our Global Kitchen

    Images © AMNH/D. Finnin

  9. In Jane Austen’s day, only the most privileged English families served “ices”—frozen desserts made of fruit, sugar and water or cream. Cooks often pressed these concoctions into fruit- or flower-shaped molds to make frosty, alluring sculptures. “For Elegance and Ease and Luxury,” Austen wrote while staying at the manor house of her wealthier brother Edward, “I shall eat Ice & drink French wine”—two exclusive treats that she did without at her own modest home.
Peek into the dining rooms of famous figures throughout history in Our Global Kitchen. 

    In Jane Austen’s day, only the most privileged English families served “ices”—frozen desserts made of fruit, sugar and water or cream. Cooks often pressed these concoctions into fruit- or flower-shaped molds to make frosty, alluring sculptures. “For Elegance and Ease and Luxury,” Austen wrote while staying at the manor house of her wealthier brother Edward, “I shall eat Ice & drink French wine”—two exclusive treats that she did without at her own modest home.

    Peek into the dining rooms of famous figures throughout history in Our Global Kitchen

  10. Stroll through an ancient market, cook a virtual meal, peek inside the dining rooms of illustrious individuals—and consider some of the most challenging issues of our time. 
The Museum’s new exhibition Our Global Kitchen: Food, Nature, Culture opens today! Image: USDA

    Stroll through an ancient market, cook a virtual meal, peek inside the dining rooms of illustrious individuals—and consider some of the most challenging issues of our time. 

    The Museum’s new exhibition Our Global Kitchen: Food, Nature, Culture opens today! 

    Image: USDA