1. From the Archives: African Botanical Illustration
A botanical illustration by Arthur August Jansson used as a reference for the Serengeti Plain Group in the Akeley Hall of African Mammals. (1926) AMNH/art_002_b2_04a

    From the Archives: African Botanical Illustration

    A botanical illustration by Arthur August Jansson used as a reference for the Serengeti Plain Group in the Akeley Hall of African Mammals. (1926) 

    AMNH/art_002_b2_04a

  2. Natural history nerds, don’t miss a special lecture tomorrow night with Tom Baione, the Museum Library’s director and editor of Natural Histories: Extraordinary Rare Book Selections from the American Museum of Natural History Library. 
This is your chance to see some of the amazing scientific illustrations housed in our Rare Book Collection. Find out which books will be on display in this Q&A. 

    Natural history nerds, don’t miss a special lecture tomorrow night with Tom Baione, the Museum Library’s director and editor of Natural Histories: Extraordinary Rare Book Selections from the American Museum of Natural History Library

    This is your chance to see some of the amazing scientific illustrations housed in our Rare Book Collection. Find out which books will be on display in this Q&A

  3. From the Archives: various species of fish from Renard’s Poissons, écrevisses et crabesIn an effort not to disappoint Europeans who saw collections of preserved tropical fish lacking their brilliant colors, Louis Renard (1678-1746) compiled the book Poissons, with fancifully colored engraved plates depicting fish and crustaceans from the Dutch East Indies (now Indonesia).Learn more.

    From the Archives: various species of fish from Renard’s Poissons, écrevisses et crabes

    In an effort not to disappoint Europeans who saw collections of preserved tropical fish lacking their brilliant colors, Louis Renard (1678-1746) compiled the book Poissons, with fancifully colored engraved plates depicting fish and crustaceans from the Dutch East Indies (now Indonesia).

    Learn more.

  4. From the archives: botanical illustrations with colors noted, for use in the Ostrich and warthog diorama in the Akeley Hall of African Mammals. (1938)
View more images from the archives here. 

    From the archives: botanical illustrations with colors noted, for use in the Ostrich and warthog diorama in the Akeley Hall of African Mammals. (1938)

    View more images from the archives here

  5. Among the Museum library’s rare books is a silk-covered album containing over 100 beautiful hand-painted butterflies on a dozen plates produced sometime between 1830 and 1871.
A fine example of Chinese trade art intended for Western consumption, the book is important for two reasons.
Keep reading here.

    Among the Museum library’s rare books is a silk-covered album containing over 100 beautiful hand-painted butterflies on a dozen plates produced sometime between 1830 and 1871.

    A fine example of Chinese trade art intended for Western consumption, the book is important for two reasons.

    Keep reading here.

  6. French artist Jacques DeSève drew this portrait of a Mount Zebra (Equus zebra) for the first edition of Count Button’s Histoire naturelle, générale (1749-1804).
See 50 stunning scientific illustrations in Natural Histories: 400 Years of Scientific Illustration, now open.

    French artist Jacques DeSève drew this portrait of a Mount Zebra (Equus zebra) for the first edition of Count Button’s Histoire naturelle, générale (1749-1804).

    See 50 stunning scientific illustrations in Natural Histories: 400 Years of Scientific Illustration, now open.

  7. Louis Renard’s artists embellished their work to satisfy Europeans’ thirst for the unusual. Some illustrations in Poissons, écrevisses et crabes, de diverses couleurs et figures extraordinaires…, like this one, include fish with imaginative colors and patterns and strange, un-fishlike expressions. 
See 50 stunning scientific illustrations in Natural Histories: 400 Years of Scientific Illustration, now open.

    Louis Renard’s artists embellished their work to satisfy Europeans’ thirst for the unusual. Some illustrations in Poissons, écrevisses et crabes, de diverses couleurs et figures extraordinaires…, like this one, include fish with imaginative colors and patterns and strange, un-fishlike expressions.

    See 50 stunning scientific illustrations in Natural Histories: 400 Years of Scientific Illustration, now open.

  8. "Natural history illustration is a wonderful art" says curator Melanie Stiassney in this video. "It can…subtly highlight the features that are very important for a particular species in a away that a photograph can’t necessarily." 

    Come see 50 striking science illustrations from the past 400 years, now on view at the Museum. 

  9. Come see 50 fantastic illustrations in the new exhibition Natural Histories: 400 Years of Scientific Illustration from the Museum’s Library (free with Museum admission!).
In this illustration, Maria Sibylla Merian  captured the life stages of three different insects around their host plant, the passion flower. One fellow naturalist called her book, Metamorphosis, the “most beautiful work ever painted in America.”
AMNH/D. Finnin

    Come see 50 fantastic illustrations in the new exhibition Natural Histories: 400 Years of Scientific Illustration from the Museum’s Library (free with Museum admission!).

    In this illustration, Maria Sibylla Merian  captured the life stages of three different insects around their host plant, the passion flower. One fellow naturalist called her book, Metamorphosis, the “most beautiful work ever painted in America.”

    AMNH/D. Finnin

  10. When the Hayden Planetarium first opened in October 1935 at the American Museum of Natural History, it was only the fourth planetarium in the United States. Inside the 75-foot dome, many New Yorkers saw, for the first time, all of the stars visible to the unaided eye, as well as the Sun, Moon, planets, and our spiral galaxy, the Milky Way.
“No dweller in cities has ever seen the stars in such splendor,” read a report from The New York Times. “Out of nothingness the heavens, with their seeming myriads of stars, spring into view as though one had been a privileged witness to their very creation.”
Read our first post in a new weekly series that highlights some of the incredible images found in the Hayden Planetarium archives.
© AMNH Library/314778

    When the Hayden Planetarium first opened in October 1935 at the American Museum of Natural History, it was only the fourth planetarium in the United States. Inside the 75-foot dome, many New Yorkers saw, for the first time, all of the stars visible to the unaided eye, as well as the Sun, Moon, planets, and our spiral galaxy, the Milky Way.

    “No dweller in cities has ever seen the stars in such splendor,” read a report from The New York Times. “Out of nothingness the heavens, with their seeming myriads of stars, spring into view as though one had been a privileged witness to their very creation.”

    Read our first post in a new weekly series that highlights some of the incredible images found in the Hayden Planetarium archives.

    © AMNH Library/314778