1. In 1869, the year the Museum was incorporated, the Trustees turned to the critical task of building its collections. Within a few months, they sent Daniel Giraud Elliot, a noted ornithologist and naturalist, and Museum Trustee William T. Blodgett to negotiate the purchase of “certain collections of specimens in Natural History” in Europe.

    Elliot and Blodgett ultimately purchased the collection of Prince Maximilian zu Wied (1782–1867), an explorer from the German principality of Wied-Neuwied. Prince Maximilian’s collection “is regarded as one of the most important private collections in Europe, and has long been consulted by the scientific world,” wrote Blodgett in his report. It was a fantastic opportunity for the nascent Museum to acquire specimens that would form the nucleus of its holdings.

    The value of the Maximilian collection lay largely in its diversity and the rarity of its specimens, containing 4,000 mounted birds, 600 mounted mammals, and about 2,000 fishes and reptiles, either mounted or in alcohol. Researchers at the Museum still study these today.

    Read the full story on the Museum’s blog.

  2. Dunkleosteus terrelli boasted a 20-foot-long body covered with bony plates of armor. Fossil records indicate that this huge fish, one of the first large jawed vertebrates in the ocean, was an aggressive predator.
The razor-sharp edges of bones in this animal’s jaws served as cutters. As they rubbed against each other, the opposing jaw blades acted like self-sharpening shears. These bones continued to grow as they were worn down by use.
Dunkleosteus is located in the Museum’s Hall of Vertebrate Origins.

    Dunkleosteus terrelli boasted a 20-foot-long body covered with bony plates of armor. Fossil records indicate that this huge fish, one of the first large jawed vertebrates in the ocean, was an aggressive predator.

    The razor-sharp edges of bones in this animal’s jaws served as cutters. As they rubbed against each other, the opposing jaw blades acted like self-sharpening shears. These bones continued to grow as they were worn down by use.

    Dunkleosteus is located in the Museum’s Hall of Vertebrate Origins.

  3. Dimetrodon was one of the earliest relatives of mammals. The large “sail” on its back may have been used for temperature regulation, to attract mates, or to frighten off other animals.
Dimetrodon is a member of a group called synapsids. Behind the eye socket in its skull is the synapsid opening. Its function is uncertain, but it may have been a passage for jaw muscles that helped Dimetrodon and other synapsids chew.
Find Dimetrodon in the Museum’s Hall of Primitive Mammals. 

    Dimetrodon was one of the earliest relatives of mammals. The large “sail” on its back may have been used for temperature regulation, to attract mates, or to frighten off other animals.

    Dimetrodon is a member of a group called synapsids. Behind the eye socket in its skull is the synapsid opening. Its function is uncertain, but it may have been a passage for jaw muscles that helped Dimetrodon and other synapsids chew.

    Find Dimetrodon in the Museum’s Hall of Primitive Mammals

  4. Congratulations to Mordecai-Mark Mac Low, a curator in the American Museum of Natural History’s Department of Astrophysics, on receiving a Humboldt Research Prize! 

    Mac Low is a leading expert on the formation of planets, stars, and galaxies, and of the structure of interstellar gas. Working with students and colleagues, the astrophysicist runs supercomputer simulations at multiple physical scales to attack the question of why stars form from interstellar gas in some parts of galaxies but not others.

    Learn more about Dr. Mac Low and the Humboldt Research Prize.

  5. Each year, the Museum’s blue whale model gets spruced up, and this year we live streamed the festivities! In case you missed our live #WhaleWash event on Monday, watch this unadulterated hour of extreme vacuuming, and pop-up whale facts. 

    For more information, check out this blog post

  6. Aspidonia Illustration
Ernst Haeckel in his work Kunstformen der Natur (1899-1904), grouped together these specimens, including trilobites (which are extinct) and horseshoe crabs, so the viewer could clearly see similarities that point to the evolutionary process.
    This and other drawings from the Museum Library’s Rare Book collection are on view now in Natural Histories: 400 Years of Scientific Illustration from the Museum’s Library.



 



© AMNH/D. Finnin

    Aspidonia Illustration

    Ernst Haeckel in his work Kunstformen der Natur (1899-1904), grouped together these specimens, including trilobites (which are extinct) and horseshoe crabs, so the viewer could clearly see similarities that point to the evolutionary process.

    This and other drawings from the Museum Library’s Rare Book collection are on view now in Natural Histories: 400 Years of Scientific Illustration from the Museum’s Library.

    © AMNH/D. Finnin

  7. When it comes to Museum sleepovers, why should kids have all the fun? We’re excited to announce our first ever Night at the Museum Sleepover for grown-ups! 150 adults will enjoy:
A champagne reception with live music
Flashlight tours of the empty Museum halls
A special presentation in the The Power of Poison exhibition with Curator Mark Siddall
A midnight viewing of the Hayden Planetarium Space Show, Dark Universe
A “Lunar Lounge” in the Gottesman Hall of Planet Earth
A cot under the blue whale when you’re ready to sleep
Get the full rundown of activities here.  

    When it comes to Museum sleepovers, why should kids have all the fun? We’re excited to announce our first ever Night at the Museum Sleepover for grown-ups! 150 adults will enjoy:

    • A champagne reception with live music
    • Flashlight tours of the empty Museum halls
    • A special presentation in the The Power of Poison exhibition with Curator Mark Siddall
    • A midnight viewing of the Hayden Planetarium Space Show, Dark Universe
    • A “Lunar Lounge” in the Gottesman Hall of Planet Earth
    • A cot under the blue whale when you’re ready to sleep

    Get the full rundown of activities here.  

  8. Happy Independence Day!

    This flag, which hangs on the Museum’s 4th floor, is a veteran of the Museum’s 1920s Central Asiatic Expeditions to the Gobi Desert, where important finds included numerous fossils of ancient reptiles, and the first discovery of dinosaur eggs. Expedition leader Roy Chapman Andrews introduced motor vehicles for the long hauls across the desert, and the flag was placed on the lead truck. Its tattered condition resulted from a fierce sandstorm.  

    Since 1990, new expeditions to the Gobi by the Museum with the Mongolian Academy of Sciences have made further important scientific finds, most notably a fossil embryo preserved in a dinosaur egg. The Andrews flag can be taken as a symbol not only of the Museum’s return to the Gobi but of its pioneering expeditions to the many places explored during its 145-year efforts to broaden scientific knowledge. 

  9. Found in 1873 near Solnhofen, Germany, this was the first fossil to show the complete wings of a pterosaur. Unearthed from a bed of limestone, this remarkably well-preserved skeleton belonged to Rhamphorhynchus muensteri, a long-tailed, dagger-toothed pterosaur from the Late Jurassic. The fine sediment fossilized not just the bones, but the tissues that formed the wing surface. The animal’s wings were partly folded, forming wrinkles that can still be seen.
See many more pterosaur fossils in the exhibition Pterosaurs: Flight in the Age of Dinosaurs, now open at the Museum. 

    Found in 1873 near Solnhofen, Germany, this was the first fossil to show the complete wings of a pterosaur. Unearthed from a bed of limestone, this remarkably well-preserved skeleton belonged to Rhamphorhynchus muensteri, a long-tailed, dagger-toothed pterosaur from the Late Jurassic. The fine sediment fossilized not just the bones, but the tissues that formed the wing surface. The animal’s wings were partly folded, forming wrinkles that can still be seen.

    See many more pterosaur fossils in the exhibition Pterosaurs: Flight in the Age of Dinosaurs, now open at the Museum. 

  10. Happy first day of summer from the American Museum of Natural History!

  11. If you’re local to the Museum, don’t miss a day of Sharks this Sunday, June 22, free with Museum admission. 
One of the sea’s most misunderstood animals, sharks have inhabited the oceans for 400 million years and play an important role in the ocean’s biodiversity. Visitors will join Curator John Maisey in the Milstein Hall of Ocean Life for an exciting program that features interactive presentations by scientists, Q&A sessions, and hands-on activities, as well as unique opportunities to examine shark and ray specimens from the Museum’s scientific collections.
Check out the full line-up of events. 

    If you’re local to the Museum, don’t miss a day of Sharks this Sunday, June 22, free with Museum admission

    One of the sea’s most misunderstood animals, sharks have inhabited the oceans for 400 million years and play an important role in the ocean’s biodiversity. Visitors will join Curator John Maisey in the Milstein Hall of Ocean Life for an exciting program that features interactive presentations by scientists, Q&A sessions, and hands-on activities, as well as unique opportunities to examine shark and ray specimens from the Museum’s scientific collections.

    Check out the full line-up of events. 

  12. This tree frog and the fossorial Amazonian frog are two of the eight previously unknown species of frogs recently described by Pedro Peloso, a herpetologist and Ph.D. candidate at the Richard Gilder Graduate School at the American Museum of Natural History

    Read about his discoveries on field expeditions in the Brazilian Amazon and in Vietnam.

  13. Hooray, the weekend is here! There’s so much going on at the Museum this weekend: celebrate World Oceans Day, meet a scientist, and see venom in action. 
Here are some highlights from the past week:
Spiders Alive! returns to the Museum on July 4th.
Meet the paleontologists who helped create the Museum’s new Pterosaurs exhibition. 
Unleash your inner artist with Color A Pterosaur!
"New" extinct ant species discovered in amber. 
Photographer Hiroshi Sugimoto takes inspiration from the Museum’s dioramas. 
Buzzfeed put us on it’s list of 25 Instagrams That Will Teach You Something New Every Day.
Have a great weekend! 

    Hooray, the weekend is here! There’s so much going on at the Museum this weekend: celebrate World Oceans Day, meet a scientist, and see venom in action. 

    Here are some highlights from the past week:

    Have a great weekend! 

  14. buzzfeed included the American Museum of Natural History on it’s list of 25 Instagrams That Will Teach You Something New Every Day, and we couldn’t agree more! Follow our feed for diorama fun facts, throwback Thursdays, and daily updates from the Museum.

    buzzfeed included the American Museum of Natural History on it’s list of 25 Instagrams That Will Teach You Something New Every Day, and we couldn’t agree more! Follow our feed for diorama fun facts, throwback Thursdays, and daily updates from the Museum.

  15. They evolved long before dinosaurs, they’re more diverse than mammals, and they inhabit every continent except Antarctica.


    They’re spiders, and in just one month, they’re back in the Museum for the live-animal exhibit Spiders Alive!. The exhibit opens July 4, features 20 live arachnid species and delves into spiders’ anatomy, diversity, venom, silk, and behavior using larger-than-life models, videos, and live presentations by Museum staff. 

    See more spider videos.