1. We’re celebrating National Moth Week with marvelous moth specimens. The existence of the Morgan’s sphinx moth was predicted by Charles Darwin more than 40 years before it was discovered! 
Take a peek at the moths we featured this week, the Madagascan sunset moth, the Hornet moth, the Atlas moth, and the Indian comet moth.
And find more moth facts on the blog!

    We’re celebrating National Moth Week with marvelous moth specimens. The existence of the Morgan’s sphinx moth was predicted by Charles Darwin more than 40 years before it was discovered! 

    Take a peek at the moths we featured this week, the Madagascan sunset moth, the Hornet moth, the Atlas moth, and the Indian comet moth.

    And find more moth facts on the blog!

  2. Today’s look into the archives shows a Museum preparator working on the mount of an East Indian ox for the Hall of Asian Mammals. 

See thousands of images from the Museum’s archives over on our Digital Special Collections website. 

AMNH/311796

    Today’s look into the archives shows a Museum preparator working on the mount of an East Indian ox for the Hall of Asian Mammals

    See thousands of images from the Museum’s archives over on our Digital Special Collections website

    AMNH/311796

  3. National Moth Week continues with the beautiful comet moth. Check our featured moths, the Madagascan sunset moth, the Hornet moth, and the Atlas moth. 
Find more moth facts on the blog!

    National Moth Week continues with the beautiful comet moth. Check our featured moths, the Madagascan sunset moth, the Hornet moth, and the Atlas moth

    Find more moth facts on the blog!

  4. This spider was trapped in tree resin about 20 million years ago. Over time, the resin fossilized to amber, preserving the animal inside. Specimens like this are helpful given that spiders don’t fossilize well in sediment. They offer researchers good information about the group’s more recent history. The oldest known amber specimen is from around 130 million years ago. This specimen was collected in the Dominican Republic. 
Learn more in our exhibition, Spiders Alive! open now. 

    This spider was trapped in tree resin about 20 million years ago. Over time, the resin fossilized to amber, preserving the animal inside. Specimens like this are helpful given that spiders don’t fossilize well in sediment. They offer researchers good information about the group’s more recent history. The oldest known amber specimen is from around 130 million years ago. This specimen was collected in the Dominican Republic. 

    Learn more in our exhibition, Spiders Alive! open now. 

  5. In 1869, the year the Museum was incorporated, the Trustees turned to the critical task of building its collections. Within a few months, they sent Daniel Giraud Elliot, a noted ornithologist and naturalist, and Museum Trustee William T. Blodgett to negotiate the purchase of “certain collections of specimens in Natural History” in Europe.

    Elliot and Blodgett ultimately purchased the collection of Prince Maximilian zu Wied (1782–1867), an explorer from the German principality of Wied-Neuwied. Prince Maximilian’s collection “is regarded as one of the most important private collections in Europe, and has long been consulted by the scientific world,” wrote Blodgett in his report. It was a fantastic opportunity for the nascent Museum to acquire specimens that would form the nucleus of its holdings.

    The value of the Maximilian collection lay largely in its diversity and the rarity of its specimens, containing 4,000 mounted birds, 600 mounted mammals, and about 2,000 fishes and reptiles, either mounted or in alcohol. Researchers at the Museum still study these today.

    Read the full story on the Museum’s blog.

  6. The Atlas moth is our featured moth of the day as we celebrate National Moth Week.
Did you know? Primitive moths appeared 195 million years ago, during the Jurassic period. Since then, more than 150,000 known species of moths have evolved in diverse colors, shapes, and sizes ranging from the European pygmy sorrel moth, with a wingspan of just 0.1 inch (3 millimeters), to the Atlas moth of Southeast Asia, whose wingspan can reach up to 12 inches (30 centimeters).
Learn more moth facts! 

    The Atlas moth is our featured moth of the day as we celebrate National Moth Week.

    Did you know? Primitive moths appeared 195 million years ago, during the Jurassic period. Since then, more than 150,000 known species of moths have evolved in diverse colors, shapes, and sizes ranging from the European pygmy sorrel moth, with a wingspan of just 0.1 inch (3 millimeters), to the Atlas moth of Southeast Asia, whose wingspan can reach up to 12 inches (30 centimeters).

    Learn more moth facts

  7. Our celebration of National Moth Week continues with the Hornet moth! Yesterday we featured the Madagascan sunset moth, and if you’re looking for more moth facts, head over to the Museum blog. 

    Our celebration of National Moth Week continues with the Hornet moth! Yesterday we featured the Madagascan sunset moth, and if you’re looking for more moth facts, head over to the Museum blog

  8. Happy National Moth Week!
We’re celebrating all week with marvelous moth species. First up, the Madagascan Sunset moth. Head over to the Museum’s blog to learn more.

    Happy National Moth Week!

    We’re celebrating all week with marvelous moth species. First up, the Madagascan Sunset moth. Head over to the Museum’s blog to learn more.

  9. The opening of the Akeley Hall of African Mammals in 1936 marked the birth of the golden age of the diorama. Named for Carl Akeley—the naturalist, explorer, and Museum taxidermist—the hall showcases large mammals of Africa.
At the center is a freestanding group of eight elephants, poised as if to charge, surrounded by 28 vivid habitat dioramas. These provide a glimpse of the diverse topography of Africa and its wildlife, from the Serengeti Plain to the waters of the Upper Nile to the volcanic mountains of what was once the Belgian Congo. 
Learn more about the Akeley Hall of African Mammals.
AMNH/K. Regan

    The opening of the Akeley Hall of African Mammals in 1936 marked the birth of the golden age of the diorama. Named for Carl Akeleythe naturalist, explorer, and Museum taxidermistthe hall showcases large mammals of Africa.

    At the center is a freestanding group of eight elephants, poised as if to charge, surrounded by 28 vivid habitat dioramas. These provide a glimpse of the diverse topography of Africa and its wildlife, from the Serengeti Plain to the waters of the Upper Nile to the volcanic mountains of what was once the Belgian Congo. 

    Learn more about the Akeley Hall of African Mammals.

    AMNH/K. Regan

  10. In June, Museum Curator John Sparks was trained in the Exosuit, a next-generation atmospheric diving system, at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts.

    Weighing more than 500 pounds (227 kg), the Exosuit offers divers protection from the ocean’s pressure while allowing them to maintain the dexterity and maneuverability to perform delicate tasks. The diving system allows a trained pilot to work at depths of up to 1,000 feet (305 meters) for hours.

    Learn more about the Exosuit

  11. The Patricia Emerald is a large and superbly colored specimen. At 632 carats, the dihexagonal, or twelve-sided, crystal is considered one of the great emeralds in the world. Found in Colombia in 1920, it was named after the mine owner’s daughter.
The flaws in this emerald are normal but compromise the hard gem’s durability. This specimen is one of the very few large emeralds that have been preserved uncut. Today, Colombia is still the world’s major source of emeralds.
See other superb specimens in the Morgan Memorial Hall of Gems.

    The Patricia Emerald is a large and superbly colored specimen. At 632 carats, the dihexagonal, or twelve-sided, crystal is considered one of the great emeralds in the world. Found in Colombia in 1920, it was named after the mine owner’s daughter.

    The flaws in this emerald are normal but compromise the hard gem’s durability. This specimen is one of the very few large emeralds that have been preserved uncut. Today, Colombia is still the world’s major source of emeralds.

    See other superb specimens in the Morgan Memorial Hall of Gems.

  12. Considered the most social of cats, lions live in prides that consist of one or more males, several females, and cubs. While a male lion consumes an average of 5,500 pounds of meat a year—mostly wildebeest, zebra, and antelopes—females do most of the actual hunting.
African lions breed at 3½ years old, and the cubs are born spotted at birth. Male lions weigh about 375 pounds while females average 265 pounds. In captivity, lions have lived up to 25 years, but in the wild they usually survive only half as long.
Find this diorama in the Akeley Hall of African Mammals.

    Considered the most social of cats, lions live in prides that consist of one or more males, several females, and cubs. While a male lion consumes an average of 5,500 pounds of meat a year—mostly wildebeest, zebra, and antelopes—females do most of the actual hunting.

    African lions breed at 3½ years old, and the cubs are born spotted at birth. Male lions weigh about 375 pounds while females average 265 pounds. In captivity, lions have lived up to 25 years, but in the wild they usually survive only half as long.

    Find this diorama in the Akeley Hall of African Mammals.

  13. On July 20, 1969, with 600 million people watching on TV, an American crew landed on the Moon—the first people ever to walk on another world. The Apollo 11 mission had three crew members: Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins, who piloted the craft that would return them to Earth, while the others became the first two men ever to walk its surface.

    Learn more about this historic event

  14. Venomous animals have evolved a variety of mechanisms that deliver toxins to would-be predators and prey. In this video, Museum Curator Mark Siddall discusses some of the anatomical features you’ll want to avoid!

    The exhibition The Power of Poison closes August 10, plan your visit now!

  15. Astronomers have long pondered the origins of enormous elliptical galaxies in the young Universe. An object 11 billion light-years away spotted by the Herschel mission may help unravel the mystery. 
Two massive spiral galaxies merged to create a giant elliptical galaxy, which were previously believed to form through the absorption of dwarf galaxies over time. 
Learn more about this finding in a Science Bulletin video. 

    Astronomers have long pondered the origins of enormous elliptical galaxies in the young Universe. An object 11 billion light-years away spotted by the Herschel mission may help unravel the mystery. 

    Two massive spiral galaxies merged to create a giant elliptical galaxy, which were previously believed to form through the absorption of dwarf galaxies over time. 

    Learn more about this finding in a Science Bulletin video