1. New research provides insight to the population distribution and “lost years” of Central Pacific green turtles, the span of time when the turtles hatch, enter the water, and emerge on a feeding ground often hundreds of miles away.
The study indicates that instead of simply drifting with ocean currents until they reach a landmass, young sea turtles may actively swim to reach specific feeding grounds.
Read the full story.

    New research provides insight to the population distribution and “lost years” of Central Pacific green turtles, the span of time when the turtles hatch, enter the water, and emerge on a feeding ground often hundreds of miles away.

    The study indicates that instead of simply drifting with ocean currents until they reach a landmass, young sea turtles may actively swim to reach specific feeding grounds.

    Read the full story.

  2. This summer, Michael Esbach, Pacific Programs manager in the Museum’s Center for Biodiversity and Conservation, traveled to the Solomon Islands to help improve sea turtle conservation in Tetepare, the largest uninhabited tropical island in the South Pacific. View the amazing slideshow documenting his work. 
(AMNH/M. Esbach)

    This summer, Michael Esbach, Pacific Programs manager in the Museum’s Center for Biodiversity and Conservation, traveled to the Solomon Islands to help improve sea turtle conservation in Tetepare, the largest uninhabited tropical island in the South Pacific. View the amazing slideshow documenting his work. 

    (AMNH/M. Esbach)