1. Happy birthday to Roald Amundsen, leader of the first expedition to reach the South Pole. 
Born to a family of Norwegian shipowners on July 16, 1872, Amundsen knew by the age of 15 that he would one day be an explorer. 
In one of the most stirring tales in the annals of Antarctic exploration, the contest to reach the South Pole was between two leaders—Roald Amundsen on the Norwegian side and Robert Falcon Scott on the British—and the challenges they faced as they undertook their separate 1,800-mile journeys from the edge of the Ross Ice Shelf to the South Pole and back. 
Amundsen was a meticulous planner; he realized that success was sure only if he correctly estimated the risks he would face, leaving little to chance. On the afternoon of December 14, 1911, Roald Amundsen and his team reached the geographical South Pole, had had won the race. 
Learn more about Amundsen and Scott’s expeditions in the exhibition Race to the End of the Earth, currently traveling. 

    Happy birthday to Roald Amundsen, leader of the first expedition to reach the South Pole. 

    Born to a family of Norwegian shipowners on July 16, 1872, Amundsen knew by the age of 15 that he would one day be an explorer. 

    In one of the most stirring tales in the annals of Antarctic exploration, the contest to reach the South Pole was between two leaders—Roald Amundsen on the Norwegian side and Robert Falcon Scott on the British—and the challenges they faced as they undertook their separate 1,800-mile journeys from the edge of the Ross Ice Shelf to the South Pole and back. 

    Amundsen was a meticulous planner; he realized that success was sure only if he correctly estimated the risks he would face, leaving little to chance. On the afternoon of December 14, 1911, Roald Amundsen and his team reached the geographical South Pole, had had won the race. 

    Learn more about Amundsen and Scott’s expeditions in the exhibition Race to the End of the Earth, currently traveling

  2. Antarctic explorer Robert Falcon Scott was born on this day in 1868.
Scott captained the British expedition to the South Pole in 1911, attempting to be the first to successfully undertake the 1,800-mile journey from the edge of the Ross Ice Shelf to the South Pole and back. The expedition was arduous, beset with disaster, and ultimately proved fatal for Scott and his team. However, his contributions to science were significant, and the legacy he leaves behind is one of exploration and encouraging scientific investigation. 

    Antarctic explorer Robert Falcon Scott was born on this day in 1868.

    Scott captained the British expedition to the South Pole in 1911, attempting to be the first to successfully undertake the 1,800-mile journey from the edge of the Ross Ice Shelf to the South Pole and back. The expedition was arduous, beset with disaster, and ultimately proved fatal for Scott and his team. However, his contributions to science were significant, and the legacy he leaves behind is one of exploration and encouraging scientific investigation. 

  3. This past November a producer with Science Bulletins, the Museum’s online and exhibition program, embarked on a seven-day journey to the South Pole to document the work of a research team working with the largest-ever telescope deployed in Antarctica. Find out more about the South Pole Telescope here. 

    This past November a producer with Science Bulletins, the Museum’s online and exhibition program, embarked on a seven-day journey to the South Pole to document the work of a research team working with the largest-ever telescope deployed in Antarctica. Find out more about the South Pole Telescope here