1. In the Scales of the Universe walkway in the Rose Center for Earth and Space, the Hayden Sphere serves as a scale of reference for exploring the relative sizes of objects and our place in space. For example, if the Hayden sphere - 26.5 meters (87 feet) in diameter - were the size of the Sun, then Jupiter would be 2.7 meters (9 feet) across, while earth would would be a mere 24 centimeters (9.5 inches) in diameter! 
Learn more about the Rose Center for Earth and Space.

    In the Scales of the Universe walkway in the Rose Center for Earth and Space, the Hayden Sphere serves as a scale of reference for exploring the relative sizes of objects and our place in space. For example, if the Hayden sphere - 26.5 meters (87 feet) in diameter - were the size of the Sun, then Jupiter would be 2.7 meters (9 feet) across, while earth would would be a mere 24 centimeters (9.5 inches) in diameter! 

    Learn more about the Rose Center for Earth and Space.

  2. thecreatorsprojecta group that celebrates artists who are using technology in innovative ways, got an in-depth look into the making of the new Hayden Planetarium Space Show Dark Universe. Their video features the team behind Dark Universe and details how they produced the stunning (and scientifically accurate) visualizations of our universe. Check it out!

  3. Watch the full 2014 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate, hosted by Neil deGrasse Tyson.

  4. Space exploration is entering a new era. Dozens of aerospace companies have emerged in recent years, all with the goal of commercializing space as never before. From serving NASA’s cargo needs to sending tourists on space vacations to mining asteroids for profit, this next generation of entrepreneurs, and not NASA, may be the ones who transform space into our backyard, possibly creating the first-ever trillionaires.
Listen in as entrepreneurs and historians debate the future of space exploration in the podcast of the Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate: Selling Space (hosted by Neil deGrasse Tyson). 

    Space exploration is entering a new era. Dozens of aerospace companies have emerged in recent years, all with the goal of commercializing space as never before. From serving NASA’s cargo needs to sending tourists on space vacations to mining asteroids for profit, this next generation of entrepreneurs, and not NASA, may be the ones who transform space into our backyard, possibly creating the first-ever trillionaires.

    Listen in as entrepreneurs and historians debate the future of space exploration in the podcast of the Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate: Selling Space (hosted by Neil deGrasse Tyson). 

  5. Wondering what this week’s breaking story about the Big Bang theory means for our knowledge of the universe? Or why you’re suddenly reading about “inflation” in a story about astrophysics? And just what are “cosmic ripples”? 
Astrophysicist Mordecai-Mark Mac Low, who curated the Museum’s new Space Show Dark Universe, helped us break down the headlines. 
Read the full story.

    Wondering what this week’s breaking story about the Big Bang theory means for our knowledge of the universe? Or why you’re suddenly reading about “inflation” in a story about astrophysics? And just what are “cosmic ripples”? 

    Astrophysicist Mordecai-Mark Mac Low, who curated the Museum’s new Space Show Dark Universehelped us break down the headlines. 

    Read the full story.

  6. Who’s joining us tonight for the annual Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate hosted by Neil deGrasse Tyson? Watch live online at amnh.org/live starting at 7:30 pm EDT.

    Who’s joining us tonight for the annual Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate hosted by Neil deGrasse Tyson? Watch live online at amnh.org/live starting at 7:30 pm EDT.

  7. As of early 2014, more than 500 people have put down deposits toward the $200,000 cost to travel aboard Virgin Galactic’s SpaceShipTwo. 
From sending tourists on space vacations to mining asteroids for profit, the next generation of space entrepreneurs, and not NASA, may be the ones who transform space into our backyard. 
Join us live online as entrepreneurs and historians debate the future of space exploration at the annual Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate, Selling Space, on March 19.
Watch the live stream hosted by Neil deGrasse Tyson here. 

    As of early 2014, more than 500 people have put down deposits toward the $200,000 cost to travel aboard Virgin Galactic’s SpaceShipTwo

    From sending tourists on space vacations to mining asteroids for profit, the next generation of space entrepreneurs, and not NASA, may be the ones who transform space into our backyard.

    Join us live online as entrepreneurs and historians debate the future of space exploration at the annual Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate, Selling Space, on March 19.

    Watch the live stream hosted by Neil deGrasse Tyson here

  8. Did you catch the premiere of Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey last night? Hear from host Neil deGrasse Tyson on April 9 at a special evening program here at the Museum.
Tickets go on sale tomorrow at noon ET.

    Did you catch the premiere of Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey last night? Hear from host Neil deGrasse Tyson on April 9 at a special evening program here at the Museum.

    Tickets go on sale tomorrow at noon ET.

  9. Make it an all-Neil deGrasse Tyson weekend! Come see Dark Universe (narrated by Dr. Tyson) this Saturday, then get ready for the premiere of Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey on Sunday.
Want more? Watch this.

    Make it an all-Neil deGrasse Tyson weekend! Come see Dark Universe (narrated by Dr. Tyson) this Saturday, then get ready for the premiere of Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey on Sunday.

    Want more? Watch this.

  10. An advanced telescopic imaging system enabled this year is the first of its kind capable of not only spotting planets orbiting other stars, but also analyzing the chemistry of their atmospheres.
In this podcast, join Museum curator and Chair of the Astrophysics Department Ben R. Oppenheimer as he discusses the system, known as Project 1640, and its implications for astrophysics and the future of remote space exploration.

    An advanced telescopic imaging system enabled this year is the first of its kind capable of not only spotting planets orbiting other stars, but also analyzing the chemistry of their atmospheres.

    In this podcast, join Museum curator and Chair of the Astrophysics Department Ben R. Oppenheimer as he discusses the system, known as Project 1640, and its implications for astrophysics and the future of remote space exploration.